Greek Orthodox Monastery Portfolios in America (Roula Alakiotou, FAIA)

ROULA ASSOCIATES ARCHITECTS, Chtd. a leading Chicago based architectural firm, with an impressive list of clients and practice,  and with a particular emphasis on large scale public sector projects. Established in 1980 by Roula Alakiotou, FAIA, a veteran in women-owned architectural firms. Over the years the firm has developed a reputation for innovative design in a variety of complex and diverse projects. 

Roula Alakiotou, FAIA
Roula Alakiotou, FAIA

Holy Trinity Greek Orthodox Monastery (MI)

Completion Date: 1997 

MI ROULA 0

An addition of 5,543 square feet to an existing house that accommodates a temporary church and housing for the monks.

MI ROULA 2

MI ROULA 3

Holy Transfiguration Greek Orthodox Monastery (IL)

Design date: 1998

IL ROULA 1

A master plan study of a 102,446 square feet for a monastery on a 100-acre site.

IL ROULA 2

IL ROULA 3

St. John Chrysostom Greek Orthodox Monastery (WI)

Religion meets science…faith meets art

Dome making.
Dome making.

New Monastic Nunnery Complex,  a spiritual center for the Greek Orthodox community in the Midwest on an 80-acre site; includes a 9,000sf Byzantine church with eight domes, chapels, support buildings, housing, arts & crafts workshops, community public spaces and a cemetery. Natural Wisconsin stone clads the entire complex enhanced by clay tile roofs and fiberglass domes. Greek masons specializing in Byzantine masonry installation, solid wood custom doors handmade by Greek carpenters in Greece . 

Details.
Details.

Area:  65,000 SF
Completed:  2003
Owner:  St. John Chrysostomos Monastery

Housing.
Housing.

5 (2)

More photos found here: http://www.roularchitects.com/st-john-chrysostomos-monastery.html

St. Nektarios Monastery (NY)

Design date: 1999

NY ROULA 1

Planning for a new church of 5,751 square feet and support facility of 9,218 square feet for the public were added to a rural 180-acre site in Roscoe, New York. The site was a summer golf retreat that is to be converted into a monastery in various phases.

NY ROULA 5 CHURCH

NY ROULA 2 N & W ELEVATION

NY ROULA 3 E & S ELEVATION

Panagia Pammakaristos Greek Orthodox Monastery (NC)

Design Date: 1999

NC ROULA 1

Planning for a church addition, parking and a cemetery for a 120-acre site in Lawsonville, North Carolina about two hours northwest of Greensboro.

NC ROULA 2

NC ROULA 3

Panagia Vlahernon Greek Orthodox Monastery (FL)

Design Date: 1999

FL ROULA 1

WI ROULA 10

ROULA 11

http://www.roularchitects.com/various-monasteries.html

http://www.roularchitects.com/uploads/2/2/1/8/22182626/bio_2013.pdf

Advertisements

Panagia Pammakaristos Greek Orthodox Monastery, Inc. (Lawsonville, NC)

NOTE: This information is taken from http://stnektariosmonastery.tumblr.com/page/47

NC 1

Panagia Pammakaristos Greek Orthodox Monastery, Inc. is a North Carolina Corporation filed on September 11, 1998. The company’s File Number is listed as 0470428.

The Registered Agent on file for this company is Tsirigotis, Dimitrios (Geronda Nektarios) and is located at 1631 Creasey Road Lawsonville, NC 27022. The company’s mailing address is 1631 Creasey Road Stokes County Lawsonville, NC 27022.

Geronda Ephraim and Geronda Nektarios
Geronda Ephraim and Geronda Nektarios

In 1998, Elder Ephraim took 3 monks originally from the St. John the Theologian brotherhood of Picton, Ontario—they were seeking refuge at the time in Florence, AZ until they could find their own monastery—and transplanted them to Lawsonville, NC where he had recently purchased a 120-acre property in order to establish the  Panagia Pammakaristos Monastery. These monks—Nektarios, Theophanes and Dionysios—were all originally from Toronto, Canada. The latter was a convert to Orthodoxy who was baptized in December 1996 at St. John the Theologian Greek Orthodox Monastery in Picton, Ontario (This monastery closed down in the Spring of ’97 after the brotherhood moved to St. Anthony’s Monastery).

Aerial view of the 120-acre monastery property.
Aerial view of the 120-acre monastery property.

Fr. Nektarios was chosen as the abbot. Earlier that year, Elder Ephraim had tonsured Fr. Nekatrios (Demetrios) before Fr. Theophanes (Anastasios)—despite the fact that Fr. Theophanes was a senior monk in rank by a couple of years to Fr. Nektarios. After the establishment of Panagia Pammakaristos, some of the older fathers stated this was a foreshadowing of future events. Fr. Nektarios was later ordained at the Holy Archangels Monastery in Texas. Also, Fr. Theophanes mother was a nun at Holy Protection Monastery at the first property in Weatherly, PA. Geronda Ephraim gave her the name Theophano.

Fr. Theophanes walking along the path.
Fr. Theophanes walking along the path.

Initially, Geronda Nektarios also had the task to liturgize at the 2 Florida monasteries and would rotate each Sunday. One of his disciples said that this was similar to his original spiritual Father, Geronda Joseph Voutsas, when he was abbot of St. John the Theologian Monastery. Geronda Joseph rotated each Sunday between his own monastery in Picton, as well as the two female monasteries in Bolton and Quebec. Today, Geronda Joseph is the abbot of St. Nektarios Monastery in Roscoe, NY.

Geronda Joseph Voutsas, Abbot of St. Nektarios Monastery, Roscoe, NY.
Geronda Joseph Voutsas, Abbot of St. Nektarios Monastery, Roscoe, NY.

Fr. Dionysios returned to the world in late 2007 after 10 years of living the monastic life. After a year or so of listening to George Noory’s Coast to Coast radio show (which he recorded nightly during the church service and listened to after the service) and reading David Icke and other similar books that were being smuggled to him, he no longer believed orthodoxy was the absolute truth and became convinced that Christianity was a lie. He altogether lost his faith in Christianity well over a year before his departure from the monastery. Having a conflict of conscience, i.e. essentially being an agnostic with inclinations towards extraterrestrial origins and yet going through the motions of the monastics life with this mindset for over a year, he compelled himself to leave after talks occurred about possibly ordaining him to the priesthood.

Simandron.
Simandron.

Though this incident created a little hiccup in the smooth functioning of the monastery, he was soon replaced by a novice from Arizona.

Panagia Pammakaristos Icon, Feast Day (2008).
Panagia Pammakaristos Icon, Feast Day (2008).

The Monks have recreated Arizona in North Carolina: Lemons, olives, cacti

Cacti
Cacti
Cacti (Guest quarters in the distance).
Cacti (Guest quarters in the distance).

NC 5